Pitfalls in Delinquent Property Tax Sales (One of Two)

In the first of two cases addressing delinquent property tax sales in a six month period, the Civil Court of Appeals ruled a purchaser of a tax certificate lost their entire investment – over $100,000 – when they failed to take possession of the subject property. Read about it on AL Appeals and contact Browne

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Retroactive Child Support Can Reach Far Back

If there are several “final” orders in a family law case, when does the obligation to pay child support begin?  According to the Alabama Court of Civil Appeals, it’s at the earliest “final” order.  Due to the time that had elapsed (because of an earlier appeal) between the various orders was significant – and resulted

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Mandatory Arbitration Clauses Appearing in Higher Ed Employment

The 11th Circuit Court of Appeals had no trouble reversing an NLRB decision involving a Florida non-profit college that had changed its employment contracts to include mandatory arbitration and waiver of class actions. Read about it on alappeals.com and contact Browne House Law about employment.

Defendant Wins Rule 32 Where Not Informed of Parole Ineligibility

When the defendant in McBurnett v. State plead to a host of charges, including sexual offenses with life sentences, he wasn’t told he would be ineligible for parole.  After his appeals were over, the defendant challenged the sentence by alleging he had not received effective counsel.  The circuit court disagreed, but the Alabama Court of

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What Happens in Juvenile Court Stays in Juvenile Court

That child support action where one party was awarded child support but nothing was said about custody – it included an implicit award of custody and going to circuit court to get some more specific order or to “modify” that implicit order might be a waste of time.  According to a recent Court of Appeals decision, the

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No Dependency Where One Custodial Parent is Fit

Alabama Department of Human Resources and the juvenile court overstepped their authority when they found a child to be dependent even though the child’s mother had joint custody, had followed DHR’s instructions and took steps to protect the child through court action. Read a discussion of the case on alappeals.com and contact Browne House Law about your

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Alabama Supreme Court Case Reminds Plaintiffs Not to Sit on Case

A statute of limitations can be the difference between a plaintiff’s ability to sue and recover for injuries and getting nothing.  A recent Alabama Supreme Court case serves as a reminder that filing the lawsuit is not the end, but that delay in getting a party served could result in losing your rights to sue.  Where

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Government Needs Warrant for that Cell Phone Location Information

Cell phones can be used to track location based on their constant pings to cell towers.  According to a new Supreme Court case, if police want to collect long term information about a your location from your cell provider, they’ll need a warrant. Read about the case on alappeals.com and contact Browne House Law about your criminal

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Social Security Hearings Might Be Conducted Without Authority

Thousands of Social Security hearings may have been held without proper authority.  The U.S. Supreme Court recently found the Securities and Exchange Commission’s use of Administrative Law Judges (ALJs) was done in a way that violated the Appointments Clause of the Constitution.  In essence, ALJs must be appointed by the president, courts of law, or

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Supreme Court May Have Given New Life to Social Security Disability Claims

In a case decided on June 21, 2018, the United States Supreme Court upended the government’s use of Administrative Law Judges (ALJs).  The case, Lucia v. SEC involved the Securities and Exchange Commission, but could have a wide impact on other types of cases including Social Security Disability cases which also use ALJs. If your

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